‘If you don’t like being an outlier, it’s time to publicly apologize’

Supporting Trump ‘good’ for a career in Republican leadership if he stays in it, says Cotton in speech

Don’t hate me, Tom Cotton

“If you don’t like being an outlier, it’s time to publicly apologize. If you’re going to be a spokesperson for a movement and a party, you have to defend every single one of those positions.”

Those were Tom Cotton’s words this morning. The Arkansas senator was addressing the Michael McShane Freedom Conference, a fundraiser held in Kentucky by the Kentucky-based Family Research Council. The event included a speech by Cotton, in which he sharply criticized Kentucky senator and Democratic nominee for the Senate, Alison Lundergan Grimes.

No, Mike Pence wasn’t prez yet – but someone needs to tell him | Anna Mulrine Read more

“If you don’t like being an outlier, it’s time to publicly apologize. If you’re going to be a spokesperson for a movement and a party, you have to defend every single one of those positions,” Cotton said.

The remark drew immediate condemnation from James Carville, the adviser who helped elect Bill Clinton.

“Who told the senator that what he just said was okay?” Carville wrote on Twitter. “And when did we become a permission body for Republicans to say anything they want, any time they want?”

But after a little over an hour of angry tweets, Carville let the senator’s remarks lie.

“I deeply respect Senator Tom Cotton, but it’s appalling that he somehow equated LGBT people and their families with Nazi’s and ISIS. Even worse that he equated opposition to today’s ill-considered, bigoted Republican policy proposals with Senator Jeff Sessions’ very nomination as attorney general. Especially in an election year, we can’t have politicians like this.”

We should question whether public deflection from mistakes in substance is the best path towards success as an activist or activist leader.

The FRC adheres to a strict worldview which tends to be more white supremacist than Christian, and which typically exploits grievances, like cultural fears about the natural environment, to fuel its agenda. For example, the network’s social media channel describes the gay lifestyle as violent and immoral, and frequently insinuates that any opposition to the movement’s positions on sexuality is a move to protect a perverted minority.

To that end, the FRC this morning released a statement in which it professed to support President Trump in spite of the president’s support for Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine, and his ignorant and downright cruel treatment of Hispanic immigrants.

Senate candidate-elect Doug Jones to voice similar concerns | Anna Mulrine Read more

“I’m for electing Republicans to office,” Cotton told this morning’s conference. “But I’m telling you, if you want someone who will actually take action, if you want someone who is a strong defender of family values, who will oppose political correctness, who will oppose accommodation of cultural extremism and social chaos, that’s what’s on the ballot this November.

“To be fair,” he continued, “that’s what’s on the ballot in November for most states. But there’s only one problem: we’re running against the strongest mainstream conservative president in the history of the republic, and that is Donald Trump.”

Leave a Comment