Hubble Space Telescope Returning To Business After ‘Safe Mode’ Restart

This week NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope was rebooted when the water pressure inside its protective gas container depleted, forcing an automatic shutdown.

Hubble is back online and back up for business with the brown sands of the Galapagos’s Great Rift Valley. NASA confirmed in a tweet on Thursday that the agency was aware of the water pressure pressure problem.

Hubble currently in safe mode due to safety margin depletion due to pressure reduction inside the coolant gas container; repair is underway. Both of these are designed to make the telescope safe and operable. Currently, both the Brown Sands and Great Rift Valleys in the Galapagos are visible. — NASA (@NASA) May 16, 2018

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has now been reactivated, days after a water pressure reduction knocked it offline for routine maintenance.

The European Space Agency noticed the leak in the gas container and shut down the telescope from April 29 until today, May 16. NASA confirmed in a tweet on Thursday that the Hubble telescope was back online and back up for business with the brown sands of the Galapagos’s Great Rift Valley.

The sharp-eyed Hubble is back! — NASA (@NASA) May 16, 2018

This repair isn’t out of the ordinary for the telescope.

“For instance, in March 2017, the telescope experienced the same fluid pressure issue and was back online in less than 30 minutes,” according to NASA.

Hubble is operated by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and is responsible for studying the universe through its historical records of objects such as the Pillars of Creation and the globular cluster El Sagrado de la Serna.

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